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At-Home Baseball Workout

This article is going to cover how to create bodyweight only “at-home baseball workouts” that will allow you to train like a baseball player from the comfort of your own home.

In the real world, we can’t always execute a perfect baseball program at the gym with all of the best equipment in the world.

Although that would be nice, a lot of the “example workouts” currently online today involve things that most people just simply don’t have access to – at least in a convenient sense anyways.

In many cases, life just simply gets busy and oftentimes we find ourselves traveling, working, doing a project at the last minute, raising a newborn, or dealing with any of the other various things that life can throw at us.

It doesn’t mean we don’t want to get better at baseball and stay in shape, it simply means we don’t have the time or resources to deal with the commute and time commitment that a gym workout demands right now.

The problem here is that most baseball players think that they need to have access to the best equipment in the world in order to get a baseball-specific workout in – this is nonsense.

We can accomplish a baseball workout using only your body weight and from the comfort of your own home, and I’m going to show you exactly how.

Creating At-Home Baseball Workouts

At-home bodyweight exercises are strength training exercises that do not require the addition of any machines, barbells, or dumbbells. The athlete’s own weight is what is going to provide the resistance for all of the movements within his/her workout.

The more traditional bodyweight exercises include things like push up squat variations, but the challenge most people run into is designing a workout that has an effective way of increasing and/or decreasing the difficulty of an exercise to meet their needs and abilities.

Take a push up for example.

If you want to make it less difficult, you have a ton of options. You can change your hand position, establish pauses throughout the set, put your knees down, or reduce the range of motion.

To make it more difficult, you have just as many options. You can change your hand position, force isometric pauses, perform failure sets, pre-exhaust the muscles before doing push-ups, or elevate your feet to place a greater load of your body weight on the upper body muscles working in the push-up.

These variations won’t only increase the exercises difficulty, but they can also increase the range of motion and therefore recruit more muscle fibers per rep.

In a general sense, an increase in reps will improve your endurance. While strength and muscle gains are going to be found by increasing the intensity of the exercise by decreasing your leverage, working through crazy ranges of motion, or by adding a plyometric component.

It’s no different than the weight training programming principles – most people just seem to get lost on the creativity behind the exercise selection. The only limitation here is in your mind.

When you utilize the training principles that we already know are deeply rooted within the scientific literature, you can design an excellent bodyweight workout to get you improving your baseball performance in a short period of time.

Any workout is better than no workout, that’s for sure.

But when you learn how to properly incorporate bodyweight only baseball training, it won’t be much of a “compensation” to miss a weightlifting session, because you’ll learn how to crush an effective session using a well-designed bodyweight only workout built upon the same principles of training.

For example, the principle of overload represents your continuous ability to provide the muscle with a stimulus that it has not been exposed to before. Thus, forcing it to adapt and become a better version of itself.

How it adapts depends on which type of stimulus you provide it through your training. Your muscle could increase in aerobic conditioning, anaerobic conditioning, strength, power, size, speed, coordination, etc.

Overload to a muscle can be provided through an increase in weight you use, an increase in the range of motion you move through, a different angle of movement, a decreased or increased rest period, longer time under tension, isometrics, and any other variation you can think of.

All of this is possible with the correct bodyweight only exercise selection.

Put another way, you all have a body, so you can all get a baseball-specific workout in no matter what life throws at you.

Example At Home Baseball Workout

A1: Bulgarian split squats x 10/leg

A2: T-stab push ups x 10/side

A3: Plank x 30 secs

Repeat A-series three times total with 10 secs rest in between exercises, and 90 secs rest in between rounds.

B1: Single leg hip thrusts x 15/side

B2: Close grip push ups x 15

B3: Bicycle abs x 15/side

Repeat B-series three times total with 10 secs rest in between exercises, and 90 secs rest in between rounds.

C1: Prisoner squats x 12

C2: Hands elevated push ups x 12

C3: V-Ups x 12

C4: Military burpees x 12

C5: T-stands x 5/side

Repeat C-series four times total with 10 secs rest in between exercises, and 90 secs rest in between rounds.

At-Home Baseball Training Recap

As you can now clearly see, your body plus the law of gravity is a fantastic way in which to get in shape and improve upon your baseball performance even during those times when you can’t make it to the gym.

Beyond this, since you are using bodyweight only movements, it’s an excellent way to improve coordination, reduce pain during movement due to improved stability, and have that conditioning you need to improve your performance in those later innings.

I find bodyweight workouts are great for increased athletic performance because bodyweight training forces you to build a functional, athletic physique because you need to be maximally co-ordinated throughout every single movement and express force in many awkward ways without the stabilization assistance that a machine would give you.

You will build lean, athletic, and symmetrical muscle that will be able to function with a high level of mobility that you will see a direct transfer over to baseball performance. Put another way, when all you have is your body, you start to know how to use it really well.

We are launching an At-Home Baseball Training Program here at BaseballTraining.com, so make sure you check out our training programs page to see if it’s live at the time of reading this article.

About the author

Dan Garner

Dan Garner is the head strength coach and nutrition specialist at BaseballTraining.com. He has coached baseball players and other athletes at all levels from youth to MLB players. Garner holds many educational credentials and has been mentored by some of the top coaches in the world.

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